Cover Reveal for A Conspiracy of Wolves

Forgive my long silence. It’s been a productive time! In early December I reviewed the copy edit of the 11th Owen Archer, A Conspiracy of Wolves, and approved the gorgeous cover. Here it is! (Didn’t the team at Severn House do a great job?!)

a conspiracy of wolves rgb final small

The jacket copy:

“1374  When a member of one of York’s most prominent families is found dead in the woods, his throat torn out, rumours spread like wildfire that wolves are running loose throughout the city. Persuaded to investigate by the victim’s father, former Captain of the Guard Owen Archer is convinced that a human killer is responsible.  But before he can gather sufficient evidence to prove his case, a second body is discovered, brutally beaten and stabbed to death. Is there a connection? What secrets are contained within the victim’s household and circle of friends? And what does apprentice healer Alisoun know that she’s not telling?

“Teaming up with Geoffrey Chaucer, who is in York on a secret mission on behalf of Prince Edward, Owen’s enquiries will draw him headlong into a deadly conspiracy.”

Severn House will publish the hardcover in the UK on 30 April, followed by the ebook on 1 August. The first of August is also the date for publication in the US and Canada, in both formats. Your wait is almost over!

The reception of the third Kate Clifford, A Murdered Peace, has been wonderful! A sampling:

“Just when I think Candace Robb can’t get any better as a writer, she does. I really enjoyed the previous two Kate Clifford books, and this brings her story together in a compelling way. The characters continue to be engaging and interesting. The story moves at a quick pace, but yet still gives time for development and thoughtful insights. A great read!” –Amy J Rio (Goodreads)

“I have read and enjoyed all of Candace Robb’s novels, but she really out did herself in this one. The characters are complex and beautifully developed as we watch the growth in Kate Clifford’s relationships with two strong and appealing men–Berend and Elric–and watch the two men grow in admiration for one another.” Judith E. Kuhn (Amazon)

“The best in the series so far. An intricate plot that never loses its way, no matter how far the web stretches, and a perfect evocation and place and the turbulent political times that comes to York.” –Chris Nickson (Goodreads)

“Kate Clifford is an ideal heroine, independent, beautiful, ingenious, loving, and always the searcher. Ms Robb provides us with actions that demand answers by characters that are believable and always striving for answers to mysteries. Great read.” –Kenneth Boyle (Goodreads)

Thank you all, readers and reviewers! I’m feeling the love.

What am I doing now? Wrestling with the opening chapters of the 12th Owen Archer and with a new website which will incorporate this blog. Changes coming…

Coming Soon–A Murdered Peace, Kate Clifford 3

A Murdered Peace will be published on 11 December, and just in case you haven’t YET preordered the trade paperback or e-book, here are some glowing reviews and an interview to entice you.

The Historical Novel Society says: “Robb deftly weaves in historical background and details, ranging from political context to facets of daily life. Fans of medieval history will enjoy the details of running a household and cooking, the history behind women’s jewelry, and the intrigues between different factions in York and beyond. Mystery fans will appreciate how Robb manages the many characters and plot twists, tying up seemingly loose ends into a creative and rational outcome. Kate Clifford is an intriguing character in Robb’s oeuvre, privileged enough to mix with the upper classes, yet streetwise and welcoming to the poor. Through her, readers are afforded a well-rounded view of 15th-century life, as well as a page-turner of a tale.” I’m all smiles! Click here for the full review (which reveals something delicious for Owen Archer fans).

Robin Agnew, owner of Aunt Agatha’s Mystery Bookshop (now online), posted this review of A Murdered Peace on the shop’s blog. And she also interviewed me for her new blog on the Mystery Scene magazine site–click here to read the interview. We’re old friends, so this was a lot of fun.

Need more enticement? Click here for an earlier post with reviews of A Murdered Peace.

I am thrilled the book is being received enthusiastically (Publishers Weekly recommended it in their holiday guide!), for I love these characters. It was tough to drag myself away from them to resume the Owen Archer series. But never fear, I’ve just reviewed and returned the copy edited manuscript of A Conspiracy of Wolves, the 11th book in the Owen Archer series, and it’s off to the printer! It will be out in hardcover in the UK on 30 April 2019, and in hardcover and e-book in the US and around the world on 1 August. I’ll be in England for some talks and signings in May–stay tuned for details!

Q&A with Kim Zarins, author of Sometimes We Tell the Truth

I am delighted to introduce you to Kim Zarins, author of the YA novel Sometimes We Tell the Truth (Simon Pulse, Sept. 2016), a brilliant retelling of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales in a contemporary setting, with the “pilgrims” as high school seniors on a class trip to Washington, DC. I loved the book when I read it two years ago, and I’m enjoying it even more on my second read. Or is it my third? (I’ve been chasing her down for this blog post for a few years. Each year at Kalamazoo she promised soon!)

I first met Kim in 2003—eons ago!—when my friend Paul Hyams invited me to spend a few days at Cornell University talking to grad students and giving a public talk on the ethics of historical fiction. Kim was one of the grad students I met, working on her PhD in English Literature. She earned her PhD in 2009 while teaching at Cornell, then Santa Clara University, and San Francisco State University. Since 2009 she’s taught at California State University at Sacramento where she’s currently Associate Professor of English. Now here’s the kicker—when she contacted me several years ago, on Twitter, as I recall, I knew at once who she was. She’d made such an impression on me all those years ago at Cornell.

So, without further ado, here’s our conversation:

Candace: First, why modernize?

Kim: It was the right choice for me for many reasons. I love reading historical fiction, but I couldn’t (and can’t) see myself writing a medieval retelling of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. I fear I’d get bogged down in researching cobblestones and privy logistics and just feel unqualified at capturing medieval London and the road to Canterbury. Similarly, while I adore Middle English, I didn’t want to wrestle with diction that sounds too ye olde Engelonde-ish. In truth, I didn’t want to convey the medieval atmosphere of Chaucer’s text so much as the characters and stories themselves, the themes that speak to us as clearly as they did back then—meeting people who are different from you and listening to them, being in love, standing up for yourself, facing uncomfortable truths. Modernizing the tales removes all the medieval atmosphere, and since a modern setting doesn’t bear much analysis for modern readers (it’s just teens on a bus riding along with the occasional coffee break), I can keep the focus on the internal growth of the characters and the storytelling dynamic.

Candace: And why teens?

Kim:  Chaucer’s characters are so much larger than life, as well as works-in-progress, and their passionate natures and vibrancy just seemed to make them perfect as teenagers, and the medieval sense of hierarchy and type-casted roles seem not all that different from the high school scene. I love the unabashed coming-of-age narrative we get in kids’ and teens’ books, and I could focus on the characters’ deep feelings and budding insights, while remaining true to their limited viewpoints. I really loved having this toy box of amazing characters to play with. I think if I were writing Geoffrey Chaucer, Father of English Poetry, I’d freeze up and not dare remove him from his pedestal, but Jeff Chaucer the shy teenager was a wonderful and accessible narrator, so frustratingly flawed but so real and relatable. I also loved the idea of meeting Chaucer’s pilgrims as teens, especially the Pardoner. There’s something redemptive about meeting the Pardoner as a teen and seeing if I can shift something so he doesn’t have to grow up and be a bitter, despairing villain. Finally, I loved the idea of writing to a teen audience and sharing these relatable stories, and hopefully spread some Chaucer love to the next generation.

[Candace jumping in to say I was so moved by Pard/the Pardoner. I felt you’d delved into the heart and soul of a character Chaucer had been just sketched in to suit his purpose and you brought out his depths.]

 [Kim jumping in to say Thank you so much! He was the character I worked on the most and the only one who voiced opinions about his own centrality in the novel. No marginalization for this Pardoner! I loved working on every scene he was in.]

Candace: As a writer I’ve wondered whether some of the tales and the pilgrims were easier to modernize than others.

Kim: Not to sound complacent or braggy (believe me, I know about writer’s block!), but some pilgrims and tales were very easy to write. This is partly because I teach Chaucer, and I try to make modern parallels for my students. For example, I make references to Twilight, or my students consider how the characters would talk if they were on Twitter. The pilgrims’ voices are so distinct—the Miller talks only like the Miller, and so on. This really helped my characters have their own voice and not bleed into one another’s. And knowing who they were helped with writing their tales, with an eye to their personalities but also Chaucer’s original tales.

When I sketched an initial outline, a modern concept would spring to mind, and the tale then would write itself. For example, The Knight’s Tale with those two Theban princes revived from the pile of corpses is just *obviously* a zombie love story, right?! And The Franklin’s Tale involves a magician willing to help a young man get a woman through a magical demonstration—the whole situation is creepily Slytherin, so the path was clear there too. I confess the fabliaux were straightforward to write, and I kept the scandalous content but provided a lot of criticism from the women on the bus (a lot of Chaucer’s male characters had to become female, because otherwise it would be a really weird demographic—it just shows how outnumbered the Wife of Bath and Prioress really were).

Other tales were more difficult. The Clerk’s Tale is just painful and The Prioress’s Tale is horribly anti-Semitic. I didn’t see how the modern Prioress could tell a story like that and not get kicked off the bus. The other thing that was hard was that I knew I wanted the Canon’s Yeomen to make an appearance, but working him in took a lot of plot points and backstory. He was the most challenging. Still, I really wanted a complete cast, so it was worth it!

Candace: Did the tales or the characters come first–that is, did you modernize the pilgrims and then think about how to modernize their tale, or did it go the other way, or vary? I love hearing people talk about their writing process. 


Kim: The characters came first. While I was writing drafts of my General Prologue, I was also writing out character descriptions. I made an Excel spreadsheet for seating arrangements based on social hierarchy (cool kids in the back, nerds in the front row), and another for the character traits and which colleges they were planning to attend, what cars they drove, etc, just so I could know more about them before I directed attention to their stories.

Candace: When teens read the book, what sorts of questions do they ask about Geoffrey Chaucer and the medieval setting? Do they ask any? 

Kim: From what I can tell, most teens are surprised that it’s a Chaucer retelling. Any Chaucer-savvy reader can see the references a mile away, but because it’s a modern retelling, it’s not at all obvious to someone unfamiliar with Chaucer. The novel simply reads as a contemporary story. So I’ve heard many teens remark that they were surprised that in the Afterword I call it a Chaucer retelling—and explain what I did—and they express an interest in reading Chaucer. I love to hear that!

Perhaps the coolest Chaucer discussion I’ve ever had with teens was at the Chaucer Celebration at Arizona State University, where I was invited to read from my book to over 100 high school students, many of them from Title I (low income) schools. The students had prepared for the event by reading The Franklin’s Tale, a tale of magic that originally came from Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron. I read my modern version, which comes across as Harry Potter-fanfiction. Before I read the excerpt, I told the students that my tale is Chaucer fanfiction of Chaucer’s Boccaccio fanfiction, all framed as Harry Potter fanfiction! After the reading, some high school students came over and wanted to hear more about Boccaccio’s winter garden and how I was playing with Boccaccio instead of going with Dorigen’s “grisly feendly rokkes blake” (I love saying that phrase aloud). The teens were eager to read Boccaccio’s tale and see for themselves how Chaucer adapted it for his purposes. We actually talked more about Boccaccio than Harry Potter, which is kind of shocking! One cool thing about that discussion was that teens really get how awesome fanfiction is, so when they find out Chaucer was doing the same thing, it intrigues them. If Harry Potter is the gateway drug to Chaucer and Boccaccio, so be it!

[Candace inserting… “If Harry Potter is the gateway drug to Chaucer and Boccaccio, so be it!” Or is Kim Zarins the gateway drug to Chaucer and Boccaccio?!]

[Kim inserting…  😉 ]

Candace: Do you think of the school trip as a kind of pilgrimage? or is it the occasion of group travel that’s the parallel?  

Kim: The trip to Washington D.C. is a secular analogue for Chaucer’s religious pilgrimage to Thomas à Becket’s shrine. It’s also a right-of-passage for many junior high and/or high school students. It seems like a transition marker and a potentially transformative trip. For me the group dynamic is the key part of the real pilgrimage, rather than the physical destination. I don’t spend much time on Washington D.C. itself, because that’s the curricular pilgrimage, the occasion for the whole thing, but the spiritual pilgrimage is really about this group of teens who learn to listen to one another and rethink one another’s stories and their own.

Candace: What more can I say except you MUST read this book. Whether or not you remember the Canterbury Tales, you will fall in love with Kim’s characters.

NOTE: And for any high school teachers reading this, if you’d like desk copies of the book, Kim invites you to contact her through her website http://www.kimzarins.com/

Kim: Thanks, Candace! This was awesomely fun!

Candace: For me as well!

Pre-publication Reviews for A Murdered Peace

Working toward a looming deadline on the eleventh Owen Archer, but wanted to share some quotes from early reviews for the Kate Clifford novel (#3), A Murdered Peace, coming out in December!

From Publishers Weekly, a starred review!
“Set in York in 1400, Robb’s superior third Kate Clifford mystery (after 2017’s A Twisted Vengeance) puts the redoubtable heroine in considerable peril. Richard II has been deposed and succeeded by his cousin, Henry IV. After Henry survives a plot to return the throne to Richard, the sovereign sees conspirators everywhere. Kate, who runs a guesthouse whose upper chambers are frequently rented to the wealthy for private assignations, finds herself between a rock and a hard place when an old friend, Lady Margery Kirkby, appears at her door seeking shelter. Lady Margery’s husband, Sir Thomas, sought to persuade Henry to improve the conditions of Richard’s imprisonment, but ended up branded an enemy of the crown and decapitated. Kate takes the new widow in, but the risks to herself increase after her former cook, who’s suspected of being a threat to Henry, is accused of murder. Robb effortlessly integrates the era’s intrigues into a whodunit framework and peoples the plot with a wide array of characters readers will come to care about.”

From Writer & Readers Magazine, Cynthianna Matthews sums up her review: “A Murdered Peace has all the hallmarks of Candace Robb’s work. Kate Clifford and her fellow people of York are complex living characters, and meticulous period research doesn’t get in the way of a fine flowing narrative and a genuine sense of mystery and peril.”

From Kirkus: “Those who meddle in the affairs of kings live to regret it…A …tale of love and murder set in a turbulent period when death and betrayal lurk around every corner.”

I’ll take those!

Remember to preorder–that and reviews on amazon or goodreads are exceedingly helpful ways to support your favorite writers!

Windows shut against the wildfire smoke, I’m madly revising A Conspiracy of Wolves–off to agent next week, to publisher at the end of September. As soon as I have a publication date I’ll let you know!

Where Have I Been?

You are wondering, aren’t you? You’ll be happy to read that I’ve been writing A Conspiracy of Wolves, the 11th Owen Archer. I’m now racing to the finish, and then I’ll be polishing and adding depth and details–the manuscript goes to my new publisher at the end of September. (More about my new publisher next month.) It is such a delight to spend months in the company of Owen, Lucie, Magda, Alisoun, and all the gang!

An amusing note about the name change: I’d chosen the title A Rumor of Wolves, but it caused headaches for US/UK cover design because “rumor” in the US is “rumour” in the UK. So now the rumor(our) is a conspiracy.

In other news, A Murdered Peace, the 3rd Kate Clifford mystery, will be coming out in early December (US, Canada, and UK ebook and trade paperback). I think you’re going to love the wrap up to the first three books about Kate.

 

Also coming in December, A Twisted Vengeance (Kate Clifford 2) in trade paperback!